U.S. Transportation Department investigating Boeing 737-8 MCAS

The Transportation Department’s probe is focusing on whether the FAA used appropriate design standards and engineering analyses in certifying the aircraft’s anti-stall system.

According to a report by the Wall Street Journal citing sources familiar with the the matter at hand, the U.S. Department of Transportation is probing the Federal Aviation Administration’s approval of Boeing Co’s 737 MAX jetliners.

The investigation was launched in the wake Lion Air’s crash in October 2018 in which 189 people were killed. The probe is being conducted by its inspector general, and the FAA has been warned that all computer files should be safeguarded.

Boeing did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The Federal Aviation Administration declined to comment.

According two officials from the government who are briefed on the matter, the investigation by the Transportation Department is not surprising given the seriousness of the issue. However, they could not immediately confirm the report.

According to the WSJ’s report which cites a government official briefed on the matter, the investigation focuses on Boeing’s anti-stall system.

Aviation authorities are looking into whether the system may have played a role in the Lion Air accident as well as the March 10, 2019 crash of the Ethiopian Airlines flight in which all 157 people on board were killed.

According to the WSJ’s report, the Transportation Department is wanting to determine whether the FAA used appropriate design standards and engineering analyses in certifying the aircraft’s anti-stall system, known as MCAS.

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